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WELCOME TO
PHOENIX AGENDA SUPPLEMENTARY SCHOOL

Musician

'If you want to go far go together ..'

Phoenix Agenda Supplementary School CIC enters its 5th year of operations !!!!

Figures in Black History

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July, 1905

Frederick Douglass

Frederick Douglass gave a speech that is now known as the “What To The Slave Is The 4th Of July” speech.  Douglass was asked to give a speech on July 4th during a commemoration of the Declaration of Independence. However he choose to give one on July 5th instead. When Douglass gave his speech he acknowledged the signers of the Declaration of Independence but he made it clear that there was too much work to be done before the  4th of July would be a day of celebration for Blacks.

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July 1948

Althea Gibson

Althea Gibson became the first Black woman
to win the tennis championship at Wimbledon.

July, 1975

Arthur Ashe became the first Black man
to win the tennis championship at Wimbledon.

Arthur Ashe

The Black Heroes of Mathematics

In this talk, Dr Nira Chamberlain (President of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications) looks at the Black Heroes of Mathematics.

At The Phoenix Agenda Supplementary School (PASS), we believe that all children and young people deserve the chance to shine. We offer Maths, English and Science tutoring, Mentoring, Needs-based support for both parent and child, Consultations and more. All global majority children are welcome. At PASS we seek to enrich the lives of our students and their families by supporting their progress towards academic, vocational and personal success.

Student Success

The heart of Phoenix belongs to our students and we love to acknowledge and showcase their accomplishments to date, please

visit our Student Success page, you are going to want to see this.

Upcoming Events

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Recent News

Pioneer of Black British Arts Movement finally recognised 

Did you know ?

Claudette Johnson is one of the founding members of the Black British Arts Movement formed in the 1980’s, and is best known for her large scale portraits of Black people.

Claudette’s work challenges traditional ideas of Black masculinity and femininity, and as she puts it ‘to tell a different story about the Black British presence’.

After an almost two decade-long hiatus from the art world – she’s making her big comeback at the Courtauld – where she is now the first Black woman to have a solo exhibition in the gallery’s ninety-one year history.

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